It is a real pleasure to meet with one whose sympathy is as broad as the human race, whose integrity is beyond question, whose disposition is accommodating, and whose aspirations are noble. Such is the character and disposition of Mr. Baughman, whose biography and portrait we present to our readers. He is one of the retired bankers of Xenia, and occupies a conspicuous position in social, political and business circles. He is now a Director of the Xenia National Bank, of which he was formerly President, having held a like position in the First National Bank before the expiration of its charter. As a representative of Christian worth, business ability and broad intelligence, he is widely and favorably known, not only in Xenia, but throughout the entire Buckeye State. Especially is his name interwoven with the history of the Reformed Church in the United States; generous in his support of all the enterprises of that church, he is particularly remembered on account of his gift of $20,000, which established the "Baughman Professorship of the Latin Language and Literature and Biblical Instruction" in the Heidelberg University at Tiffin, Ohio.

A native of Washington County, Md., Mr.Baughman was born seven miles east of Hagerstown, October 11, 1807, his parents being Andrew and Esther (Herr) Baughman. The father was born and married in Lancaster County, Pa., and followed the occupation of a farmer and hotel-keeper; during the War of 1812 he was Captain of a volunteer company. He survived his wife eight years, she having passed from earth when her son, Andrew H., was a lad of only seven years. Soon after her decease our subject was taken into the home of his uncle, who lived on a farm west of Hagerstown, and there he remained until he was fifteen years of age. Then commencing life for himself, he worked in a mill getting no wages the first year, and during the second year received $5 per month. There he remained until of age, never at any time receiving more than $9 per month, but from this salary managed to save a small amount.

After having attained his majority, young Baughman walked all the way to Wheeling where he boarded a trading boat for Cincinnati, receiving his passage and fifty cents per day for labor performed on board. From Cincinnati he went to Hamilton, where two uncles were living, and after sojourning a day or two with them he came to Alpha, Greene County. On Christmas day he began to work in Harbine's mill, getting $9 per month and his board. Adding to what he had saved while at the Whitmore mill, he succeeded in accumulating the sum of $100, when with his cousin, Jacob Herr, he rented the mill and sawmill running them successfully during the years 1830 and 1831. He was then offered one-third the profits of the Snyder mill if he would become its manager, which position he accepted, continuing so engaged until 1836, when he formed a co-partnership with his employer's son, Casper Snyder. Buying the mill they operated it for a number of years under the firm name of Baughman & Snyder.

Mr. Baughman was manager of the mill until 1853, it having in the meantime been enlarged and good brick houses having replaced the log huts that were about it when he took charge. He was also one of the first to engage in the distilling business in the county. In 1853 he sold his mill interests and bought a farm of two hundred and fifty acres that he set about improving while Mr. Snyder with whom he still continued a business connection, took charge of both the Old Town mills, which they had purchased, and in which Mr. Baughman still owns a half interest. The first real estate that he possessed was a farm in Greene County, which he had purchased while still employed by the elder Snyder. His first taxable property was a horse and he yet has the receipt for forty cents tax, which he paid upon it, and can place that receipt beside one for $1,100, the amount of his present taxes.

In addition to the farm, which lay two miles southwest of Xenia, Mr. Baughman bought in the city limits seven acres, which is included between King Street on the east, Galloway on the west, Church on the south, and Shawnee on the north. In 1871, he erected on this site an elegant residence which, surrounded by a beautiful lawn, is still one of the most tasteful abodes within the city.

mary baughmanMr. Baughman was first elected a Director of the Xenia Bank, which afterward became a branch of the State Bank of Ohio, and on the passage of the National Bank Law was changed into the First National Bank, of Xenia. In each of these organizations he had been a Director and Vice-President, and upon the death of the President of the First National, he was elected to that position, retaining it until the expiration of the charter of the institution. When a re-organization was effected under the title of the Xenia National Bank, the Governor not permitting them to take the former name, he became the first President, continuing to hold that station until his health compelled him to resign. He still retains his financial interest in the bank, and the office of Director, which has been his for thirty-eight years. He does a real-estate, banking and private loan business.

In the political arena Mr. Baughman has been a busy man, having held the office of County Commissioner for twelve years, besides being Alderman for a lengthy period, during which he was President of the Board three terms. Many times he has been solicited to run for more prominent offices, but was too busy to devote himself entirely to politics or public life. He began his political career in Maryland and when he became of age cast his first Presidential ballot for Gen. Andrew Jackson. He continued to affiliate with the Democratic Party until 1856, when he voted for John C. Fremont, and since then has wielded all his influence in behalf of Republicanism.

Mr. Baughman has been a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows since 1846. In 1833, he united with the Reformed Church in the United States, where he has continually held an official position, having been re-elected Elder, in January 1890. He has been Deacon, Sunday-school Superintendent, Delegate to the Synod and Classis, Treasurer of Ciassis and Board of Church Erection, member of the Peace Commission and for many years one of the Board of Trustees of the Heidelberg University. he has been a liberal supporter of the church in all her enterprises, and was the largest contributor to the new college building at Tiffin. His name will he revered by future generations for his munificence, and particularly for the deep interest which he has manifested in the university named. The confidence of the public in him is shown by the fact that he has been guardian for fourteen children and has settled ten large estates.

The wife with whom Mr. Baughman has lived happily fifty-seven years, bore the maiden name of Mary Snyder, and the rites of wedlock were celebrated between them February 7, 1833. Mrs. Baughman was born in Washington County, Md., September, 7,1814. She is a daughter of Jonathan Snyder, one of the early pioneers of this county, to which he came in 1816, when his daughter was scarcely more than an infant. He built the first mill in this vicinity; the structure being afterward purchased by our subject and his partner. Having no children of their own, Mr. and Mrs. Baughman have adopted and reared several, to whom they have become strongly attached, and who have been given all the advantages which would have been theirs had they been bound to them by ties of blood.

 

Portrait and Biographical Album of Clark and Greene Counties, Chapman Bros., Chicago, published 1890