THOMAS L. BEAL is a dealer in general merchandise in Byron, Greene County, doing the principal business there and manifesting a degree of energy and business tact which gives promise of a bright future. He is also Assistant Postmaster, and does all the business of the office, the affairs of which are left entirely in his hands by J. L. Cosler, who received the appointment of Postmaster, when in 1889, the office was located here.

Mr. Beal comes of an old Greene County family, his grandfather, Aaron Beal, a native of Virginia, having located here in 1819. He bought and cleared land on Ludlow Creek, and became the owner of three hundred acres of landed estate. He had followed the trade of a blacksmith in his native State, and continued it in connection with farming after his removal, putting up a shop upon his farm. He was a soldier in the War of 1812. His son Aaron was born in Beaver Creek Township, and when of a suitable age became a farmer. He bought land near Goes Station, in Miami Township, and cleared one hundred and thirty-five acres upon which he engaged in general farming and stock-raising. In these pursuits he was successful and also in buying and selling stock. He departed this life April 18, 1887, respected and mourned. He was an active member of the Reformed Church at Byron.

In the maternal line also our subject is of Virginian ancestry, his grandfather, William Oram, having been a native of that State. He was a farmer and cooper, and a mechanic in various lines of woodwork. At an early period in the history of this county he took up his residence here, locating on a small farm in Miami Township, and carrying on a cooper shop until his death. His daughter Annie, who was born in Virginia, became the wife of Aaron Beal, to whom she bore three daughters and two sons. Her first-born, Mrs. Mary Hopind, lives in Dayton; Marcellus is a farmer at Fairfield; the third child is our subject; Mrs. Priscilla F. Rheinhart is the wife of a blacksmith at Goes Station; Jessie also lives at that place. The mother, who is now about sixty years of age, lives with a daughter in Miami Township; she is a consistent member of the Reformed Church.

T. L. Beal opened his eyes to the light June 16, 1858, in Beaver Creek Township, on the banks of Ludlow Creek. When be was three years old his parents removed to Miami Township, where he was reared and educated, having good school advantages, and in the intervals of study being early put to work on the farm. Upon reaching his majority he rented his father's farm and began cropping it for himself, remaining upon it until 1882, when he rented a farm on Ludlow Creek. A year later he returned to the home farm, which he continued to carry on from that time until the spring of 1887. He then bought the old Enniss stand at Byron, remodeled it and put in a new stock of goods, and began his career as a merchant. He carries groceries and general merchandise, dealing also in produce and flour. Prosperity has attended his efforts and his career has been wonderfully successful for one so young.

Mr. Beal chose for his companion Miss Elizabeth Norris, of Dayton, whose intelligence and womanly virtues won his regard and with whom he was united in marriage February 28, 1882. Mrs. Beal is the youngest child of Hezekiah and Susannah (Thumb) Beal, and was born in Dayton, October 5, 1858. Her father is a native of Frederick County, Md., and a carpenter by trade. He came to Xenia a number of years ago, but soon afterward removed to Dayton, where he still lives. He has worked at his trade in different parts of Greene and Montgomery Counties. His wife was also born in Maryland and both are worthy members of the United Brethren Church. They are parents of seven children: Mrs. Anna P. Dunn, of Beaver Creek Township, this county; Aquilla and John, who live in Dayton; Leo J., deceased; Mrs. Sarah C. Archer of Dayton; Joseph M., a groceryman in Dayton, and, Mary Elizabeth.

The marriage of Mr. and Mrs. Beal, has been blessed by the birth of three bright children--Lillie B., Bessie T. and Arthur L. Mr. Beal exercises the right of suffrage in behalf of the Democrat party and its candidates. Mrs. Beal belongs to the Methodist Church in Centerville.

 

Portrait and Biographical Album of Clark and Greene Counties, Chapman Bros., Chicago, published 1890