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Walter T. Guilbert was born in Guernsey County, Ohio, of French-Irish ancestors, and was reared on a farm. His great-grandfather on the maternal side settled in Maryland about 1750 and played an active part in the Revoluntionary War. He was wounded several times, and at the battle of Brandywine only escaped capture by the thoughtfulness of his comrades, who carried the wounded man to a swamp and securely hid him until the British had withdrawn. The father of Mr. Guilbert came to this country from France when a youth and settled in Guernsey County.

The subject of this sketch was educated in the public schools and at Wenona Academy, Illinois. He was twice elected Auditor of Noble County, Ohio, and proved himself a most capable official. In 1888 he became chief clerk in the Auditor of State's office, continuing in that position until 1896, when he succeeded to the important office of Auditor of State, having been nominated by the Republican party and elected in the fall of 1895. In his career as a public officer, Mr. Guilbert is a genial, patient and painstaking official, combining with these virtues an earnest intention to perform his duties in such a manner as to insure the best results for the people of Ohio. It is no flattery to say that his manner of transacting the business of his department has made him one of the most popular men who ever occupied a position in the state capitol. He was renominated unanimously in 1899 and elected by an increased plurality for a second term on which he entered in January 1900. Mr. Guilbert has been active in the affairs of his party having served as chairman of his county committee for a number of years, and as a member of the state executive committee. He was also a delegate to the national republican convention in 1888.

Mr. Guilbert was married February 5, 1868, to Miss Mary L. Jordon, of Noble County. They have a family of three children, two sons and one daughter. He is connected with a number of secret and social organizations, being a Mason, a Knight Templar, a member of the Mystic Shrine, of the I.O.O.F., of the K. of P., and I.O.R.M.

 

The Ohio Hundred Year Book, by Elliot Howard Gilkey, Fred J. Heer, State Printer, Columbus, 1901