D. C. Johnson, a substantial citizen of Newberry Township, Miami County, Ohio, owns and resides upon a farm of 180 acres located on the Troy Pike, about one mile southeast of Covington.  He has lived on this farm since September 2, 1856, having at that time moved from Wayne Township, Montgomery County, Ohio, where he was born.  The date of his birth is February 26, 1831, and he is a son of Joseph and Mary J. (Stoker) Johnson.  His father was a native of Virginia and became a prominent farmer of Wayne Township, Montgomery County, whither he moved in his early days.

D. C. Johnson was the youngest of thirteen children and was but two years old when his father died and thirteen at his mother's death.  He went to live with Squire Thomas Crook, father of General George Crook, who attained distinction in the Union Army during the Civil War.  He and General Crook were reared to manhood together, and he continued to live at the Crook home until his marriage in 1852.  He and his wife set up housekeeping on a farm of seventy-five acres in Wayne Township, which he owned, but in December of the same year moved to a farm one mile east of his present farm in Newberry Township, where he bought eighty acres.  After three years he moved back to Wayne Township, Montgomery County, where he remained one summer.  He then purchased 160 acres of his present farm, to which he later added twenty acres; a brick house had been erected on the place in 1852, which he has since more than doubled in size and improved in every way.  He has other good substantial buildings on the place and one encounters few farms so well improved.  He and his wife own a sixty-acre farm about a mile east of their home, which is farmed by their son, Henry Johnson.

On March 18, 1852, Mr. Johnson was joined in marriage with Mary Jane Brenner, who was born about seven miles north of the court-house in Dayton, in Wayne Township, Montgomery County, and is a daughter of Jacob and Sarah Ann (Mathews) Brenner.  The following children were born to them:  Sarah Ann, who died December 31, 1856, aged two years, ten months, and twenty days; Henry, who was first married to Emma Kaufman (deceased), and second to Mary Dick; Jacob, a blacksmith of Covington, who married Lucy Dickey and has a daughter, Mary; William Clement, who married Henrietta Kruse, by whom he had a daughter, Clara Viola Landis and has two children living, Oscar Millison and Ferril Amanda.  Mr. and Mrs. Johnson have had fifty-seven year of married happiness, and are living in the enjoyment of comparative good health.

 

Centennial History Troy, Piqua, and Miami County, Ohio, Thomas C. Harbaugh, 1909